Shark Attack

Cubicles are dreadfully uninspiring and most of my workday is presently spent in the unforgiving grasp of four drab walls. I make it a point to frequently stand up and wander the office space. Today, an observant watchstander made a clever estimation after he saw me roam the building, “Nasfell, what are you doing? You’re like a shark swimming around a tank.”

shark

On the way home I was listening to a Neil Gaiman book where he stated, “Sharks are better at being sharks than anything else.” (Okay, okay that settles it…I know what I have to write about.)

I love this idea from Neil, although I’ve always applied it to chess pieces. A knight is powerful because it moves like a knight. A bishop is powerful because it moves like a bishop. A rook does not try to imitate a knight or a bishop. Each piece is impeccably flawless and fiercely powerful in its own right.

chess

THE CHALLENGE:  You are like a chess piece. Determine what “piece” you are and stay true to that, and that alone. We spend too much time trying to change – and not enough time trying to be what we are. In your social interactions, remember – we are different – and that is okay! Genetic diversity is nature’s strength as it is society’s. Be careful not to judge a fish for its inability to climb a tree.

Photos by Nan Palmero and Steve Johnson

Painful Pervasive Poaching

Over 1,000 rhino’s are poached each year for a single body part, the horn. Apparently this pointy steak skewer is worth a small fortune on the black market. Not that I have any idea how much $$$,$$$ I could get for one, and here’s why:

  1. I can’t think of a single use for a keratin spike.
  2. As far as my corner of the globe is concerned rhinos are already extinct…even looked outside my window to verify.
  3. I respect the wishes of rhino advocates who ask that this information not be published.

Interesting fact: Rhino horns grow back – provided they are cut properly.  In an effort to deter poachers, de-horning is a popular (and very costly) trend.  De-horning is a process similar to cutting your fingernails – only much shorter. What if you were a rhino? How would you feel about this?

What if humans were poached for a valuable body part? What if outside organizations trimmed us up a little bit to keep us safe? Can you imagine a society with no left hands, right feet, or in this case noses? Perhaps you would feel angry, useless, violated, or depressed – as you should!

We all have an individual “rhino horn”, something that makes us truly unique. Your horn is that which you value most. It might be another person, your family, a goal, a vision, a talent, a home, or a reputation.

Every single day, your horn is at risk. Marketing campaigns, political agendas, two-faced acquaintances or outright enemies will poach you without a second thought. You have something of value and someone else wants it. It might be your money. It might be your voice. It might be your silence.  It might be your indifference. It might be your support.

THE CHALLENGE: Identify your personal rhino horns.  For the sake of this exercise there should be two; a primary and a secondary, just like the animal. What will you do to protect your horns?

For example, if your primary horn is your family, what specific systems can you set in motion to improve how to mentor your children or how to make your spouse’s heart skip a beat? Do your children have free reign on the internet? What information do they access? Is your home protected? Do you have insurance and health benefits? Do you have savings? What about family traditions? Do you keep a journal to leave for your posterity? What about your ancestors? Do you keep in touch with mom and dad, grandparents or great grandparents? Do you reflect on their teachings? Do you protect any heirlooms left behind? The ways that you can safeguard this “horn” are infinite…but only you can decide what is best for your own circumstance and belief system. Maybe this is something worth pondering next time you earn couch time. Give it a try!

Photo by Jin Kei